ResourcesRequired ResourcesTextBarnes, L. &amp Bowles, M. (2014

ResourcesRequired ResourcesTextBarnes, L. & Bowles, M. (2014).The American story: Perspectives and encounters from 1877. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.Chapter 7: Tradition and Modernity in the 1920sChapter 8: The New Deal Chapter 9: The Second World WarArticlesBliven, B. (1925, Sept. 9). Flapper Jane. New Republic. Retrieved from http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113130/bruce-bliven-interviews-flapperA magazine article originally published in 1925 about flappers. This is a primary source and is acceptable to use as a source for the Final Project.Hardenbergh, M. (1923, Aug. 12). Taking the hand off the cradle to catch devil-fish: How modern woman is delving into the sacred precincts of male occupation and is now found in the role of bandit, judge, bricklayer, hunter, and race horse jockey [PDF file]. The Atlanta Constitution, 2-3. Retrieved from http://www.americainclass.org/sources/becomingmodern/modernity/text2/colcommentarymodernwoman.pdfA newspaper article published in 1923 about women working in formerly all-male jobs. This is a primary source and is acceptable to use as a source for the Final Project.Hartt, R. L. (1921, Jan. 15). “The new Negro”: “When he’s hit, he hits back!” Independent, 76, 59-60. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5127A newspaper article published in 1921 about a new determination among African Americans to achieve equality and respect. This is a primary source and is acceptable to use as a source for the Final Project.Indian Thorpe Greatest Sport Marvel of All Time. (1922, Feb. 18). The Evening World. Retrieved from http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030193/1922-02-18/ed-1/seq-7.pdfA newspaper article published in 1922 about Jim Thorpe, a famous Native American athlete. This is a primary source and is acceptable to use as a source for the Final Project.Marshall, C. C. (1927). Should a Catholic be president?: A contemporary view of the 1928 election. Atlantic Monthly, 139, 540-544, 548-549. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5074A magazine article published in 1927 arguing that Catholic Americans’ first loyalty was to the Pope and not country, making them unacceptable for holding high public office. This is a primary source and is acceptable to use as a source for the Final Project.McDougald, E. J. (1925). Elise Johnson McDougald on “The double task: The struggle of Negro women for sex and race emancipation”. In A. Locke (Ed.), The New Negro: An Interpretation. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5126An essay published in 1925, discussing the challenges faced by African-American women in different economic groups. This is a primary source and is acceptable to use as a source for the Final Project.Smith, E. (1924, Apr. 9). “Shut the door”: A senator speaks for immigration restriction. Congressional Record, 68th Congress, 1st Session (Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1924), Vol. 65, 5961–5962. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5080An excerpt from a congressional debate on the Immigration Act of 1924 that illustrates attitudes toward different groups of immigrants at that time. This is a primary source and is acceptable to use as a source for the Final Project. U.S. Supreme Court. (1923). Not all Caucasians are White: The supreme court rejects citizenship for Asian Indians. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5076An excerpt from a Supreme Court ruling from 1923 in which the Justices ruled that only free whites could be US citizens. This is a primary source and is acceptable to use as a source for the Final Project.MultimediaJacobs, R. (Writer), & Paley, C. (Director). (1994). World War II: Breadlines to boomtimes [Documentary film]. Retrieved from https://secure.films.com/OnDemandEmbed.aspx?Token=44854&aid=18596&Plt=FOD&loid=0&w=640&h=480&ref=A video chronicling the American experience during the Great Depression and World War II.Library of Congress. (n.d.). Primary source analysis tool. Retrieved from http://www.loc.gov/teachers/primary-source-analysis-tool/A tool developed by the Library of Congress to help students analyze primary sources.Online Classroom TV. (Producer). (2009). Credibility: Critical thinking [Series episode]. In Critical thinking. Retrieved from https://secure.films.com/OnDemandEmbed.aspx?Token=49814&aid=18596&Plt=FOD&loid=0&w=640&h=480&ref=A video that discusses how students can determine the credibility of historical sources, especially primary sources. Recommended ResourcesReadingsCrosby, E. (2005). A taste of freedom. In A little taste of freedom: the Black freedom struggle in Claiborne County, Mississippi(pp. 15-27). Retrieved from the ebrary database.An e-book of oral histories related to the struggle for equality for African Americans in Claiborne County, Mississippi. This is a primary source and is acceptable for use in the Final Project.Honey, M. K. (1999). From country to city: Jim Crow at work. In Black workers remember: An oral history of segregation, unionism, and the freedom struggle (pp. 43-49). Retrieved from the eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) database.An e-book of oral history interviews related to the experiences of African American workers as they endured discrimination and segregation. This is a primary source and is acceptable for use in the Final Project.Terkel, S. (1970). Honor and humiliation. In Hard times: An oral history of the Great Depression (pp. 478-500). New York: Pantheon Books. Retrieved from the ACLS Humanities E-Book database.An e-book of oral history interviews that reveal the challenges that Americans faced during the Great Depression. This is a primary source and is acceptable for use in the Final Project.Vargas, Z. (1999). Proletarians of the north: A history of Mexican industrial workers in Detroit and the Midwest, 1917-1933. Retrieved from the eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) database.A scholarly book that examines the conditions experienced by Mexican industrial workers in the Midwest between 1917 and 1933. This is a scholarly secondary source and is acceptable to use in the Final Project.Walker, M. (2004). French Carpenter Clark. In Women’s diaries and letters of the South: Country women cope with hard times: A collection of oral histories(pp. 57-62). Retrieved from the ebrary database.An e-book of oral history interviews related to the experiences of rural women in 20th century United States. This is a primary source and is acceptable for use in the Final Project.Wunder, J. R., Kaye, F. W., & Carstensen, V. (1999). Letters from the Dust Bowl. In Americans view their Dust Bowl experience (pp. 93-112). Retrieved from the ebrary database.An e-book of personal letters written by Americans living in the Dust Bowl region of the Great Plains during the Great Depression. This is a primary source and it is acceptable to use in the Final Project.MultimediaPetrow, R. (Producer & Writer), & Moyers, B. (Writer). (1984). The twenties [Series episode]. In M. Koplin (Executive producer), A walk through the 20th century with Bill Moyers. Retrieved from https://secure.films.com/OnDemandEmbed.aspx?Token=42071&aid=18596&Plt=FOD&loid=0&w=640&h=480&ref=A video that examines the social changes of the 1920s.Take a few minutes to think about the material that we’ve covered in this course so far.Reflect on what you found interesting, surprising, or confusing in this past week. Did anything that you learned cause you to understand an issue and event differently? Have you discovered any habits or tips that help you to complete your course work more effectively or efficiently?Write: This discussion forum is an opportunity for you to explore topics that interest you, share critical insights and questions that you are working with, share your struggles and triumphs, and discuss difficulties that may have arisen this week, hopefully finding solutions. Your initial post should describe your experiences in the course this past week, prompting further discussion. You should address at least two of the following questions:What struck you in particular as you explored the course materials this week?What insights have you had?What have you been struggling with?What questions have come up for you at this point?Do you have any helpful tips that you’ve picked up in this course or in a past course?Do you have questions about the assignment that your classmates might be able to help with? (If you have a question for the instructor, be sure to contact your instructor through email or in the Ask Your Instructor Forum).You are required to post at least 100 total words in this forum this week. You can post one time or ten times, the only requirements are that you post at least 100 words total and that you engage in conversation related to course content. Ask questions, answer questions, provide extra resources you found that are interesting, or engage in a debate about something you learned this week. The only requirement is that your comments have to relate to the course content.Provide a full explanation of the issues that you discuss in your posts. For example, if you write that you had difficulty finding sources for your Final Project, explain where in the process of finding sources you had difficulty. Was it choosing a database to search? Thinking of search terms? Did your search return too many sources that were not relevant to your topic? Did your search return too few results?

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